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How do I split a lot?

The steps you'll follow depends on the size and number of lots you want to split.

If your parcel meets all of the conditions below (as defined in Ohio Revised Code 711.131), it's considered a minor subdivision and doesn't require a plat:

  • It's along an existing street, not involving the opening, widening or extension of any street or road, and involving no more than five lots, any one of which is less than five acres, after the original tract has been completely subdivided. (Original tract is "the tract of land as it appeared on the Morrow County Engineer's parcel map on the effective date of the Subdivision Regulations."); and
  • Each lot or parcel, including the remnant tract, must have at least 200 feet of continuous road frontage and comply with Table 1 in Section 405 of the Subdivision Regulations; and
  • The lot depth must not be more than three times the lot width (the remnant tract is excluded if the parcel is more than five acres); and
  • The proposed split is not contrary to the Subdivision Regulations any any applicable platting, subdividing, zoning, health, sanity or access management regulations; and
  • The proposed subdivision must be approved and/or accepted by the Morrow County Health Department, zoning inspector (if applicable), Planning staff, the Morrow County Engineer and other government agencies as the Planning staff deems necessary; and
  • Upon final approval and recording of the lot(s), you must obtain a street address for each lot from the Morrow County House Numbering Office (which is located in the Planning Office).

If your parcel involves any one of the following, it's considered a major subdivision:

  • The division of a parcel of land, shown as a unit or as contiguous units on the general tax list and duplicate of real and public utility property, into six or more parcels, including the remnant tract, any one of which is less than five acres: or
  • The division of a parcel of land, shown as a unit or as contiguous units on the general tax list and duplicate or real and public utility property into two or more parcels, including the remnant tract, regardless of size, which includes the division or allocation of land for the opening, widening, or extension of any public or private street or streets, except private streets serving industrial structures, or involving the division or allocation of land as open space for common use by owners, occupations or leaseholders or as easement for the extension and maintenance or public or private sewer, water, storm drainage or other similar facilities; or
  • Subdivision of any parcel in an existing, recorded plate (at the discretion of the Commission; or
  • The division of a parcel of land, shown as a unit or as contiguous units on the general tax list and duplicate or real and public utility property into six or more parcels, including the remnant tract, regardless of size, which involves the inclusion of an easement of access.

Your split is considered a large lot division (as authorized in Ohio Revised Code Section 711.133) if it involves:

  • A proposed division of a parcel of land along an existing street, not involving the opening, widening or extension of any street or road; and
  • The lot size is no less than five acres to no more than 10 acres.

Large lot divisions must meet applicable zoning and health regulations, including, but not limited to, minimum road frontage, lot depth to width ratios and setbacks.

To start the lot split process, contact the Planning Office and schedule an appointment for a pre-application meeting with the Technical Review Board. You'll also need to complete a Minor Lot Split Form, Major Subdivision Application or a Large Lot Exemption Form and pay a fee.

For more information see the Subdivision Regulations (section 301 for minor subdivisions; section 304 for major subdivisions; and section 306 for large lot subdivisions).

 

How do I request a variance?

You can request a variance when your lot split does not meet the requirements outlined in the Subdivision Regulations. Here is how the process works:

  • After you complete a Variance Application and pay the fee, the Planning Office will schedule a meeting with the Commission's Variance Review Committee.
  • After reviewing your request, the Variance Review Committee will make a recommendation to the full Commission at its next regular meeting. The full Commission will vote on your request at that meeting. You should attend both meetings to present your information and answer any questions.
  • You will receive a follow-up letter after the Commission meeting about your variance request.

For more information, see Section 203 of the Subdivision Regulations or contact us.

 

How do I rezone my property?

To rezone your property (or if you need a permit for a new house or other structural addition), contact the appropriate zoning inspector.

If you live in Bennington, Canaan, Congress, Gilead, Harmony, North Bloomfield or Washington township, contact the county zoning office. If you live in Cardington, Chester, Lincoln, South Bloomfield, Troy or Westfield township, contact the appropriate township. Franklin, Perry and Peru townships do not have zoning.

Note: Morrow County does not have a building code, nor do any of its villages or townships.

 

How do I schedule an appointment with the Technical Review Boards?

Morrow County offers a Residential Technical Review Board and a Commercial/Industrial Technical Review Board to give property owners all of the lot split information they need -- in one face-to-face meeting with county office representatives -- before they get started. Meeting with the appropriate Technical Review Board before you begin the lot split process will help you save time and money. Read an overview of the Technical Review Boards.

Each Technical Review Board includes representatives from these county offices: Planning, Zoning, Health, Soil and Water, and Engineer; the Development Director is a member of the Commercial/Industrial Technical Review Board. You'll need to bring a to-scale drawing of your lot split, with the location, size and drainage description (if you know it). There is no fee to attend the meeting.

The board meets on Tuesday mornings, and an appointment is required. Please contact the Planning Office to schedule an appointment with the Technical Review Board. We'll ask you to fill out a Technical Review Board Application. After you send us your completed application, we'll need a week's notice to set up an appointment.

 

How do I transfer property to an adjacent parcel?

Lot splits for the purpose of sale or exchange of property between adjoining property owners, where the sale or exchange does not result in the creation of additional building site(s), are exempt from the Subdivision Regulations

Although these types of lot splits are exempt from the Subdivision Regulations, the requests still must be reviewed by the Morrow County Planning Office. This review is necessary to verify that the lot splits are exempt from the Subdivision Regulations. As a result, there is a fee for this transfer.

In addition to Planning Office review, property owners must:

  • Have the endorsement of the appropriate zoning inspector (township, county or village) and the Morrow County Health Department. This is to ensure the parcel being reduced in size still complies with all standards.
  • The survey must be stamped by the Health Department as "Not Approved as Building Site; Approved for Transfer."
  • The Grantees' names on the deed must match the ownership of the adjacent parcel to which the transferred acreage is to be associated.
  • Deeds for adjacent property transfers must include this covenant notation before approval is given: "The herein described [X] acres shall not constitute an independent building site separate from the Grantee's adjacent parcel unless approved as such in accordance with applicable Subdivision Regulations."

If the lot split meets all requirements, it will be approved within seven business days. If the lot split is not approved, the Planning Office will contact you to explain why.

For more information, see Section 303 of the Subdivision Regulations or contact us. You also may want to contact an attorney and/or surveyor for assistance.

 

How do I contact the Planning Office?

The Planning Office is open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, except on federal holidays. You can reach the Planning Office by phone, in-person or by e-mail; the Contact us page has the details.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 15 April 2014 11:50

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